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‘Aro mai, Aro atu, Aroha’

To face, to be faced by, to love.

 

Aro are a blend of stories in song expressing the people, the culture and the land of Aotearoa.

Aro are a husband and wife duo, made up of Charles (Ngāpuhi) and Emily Looker (nee Rice). The pair met at Te Whare Wānanga o Tāmaki Makaurau (University of Auckland), both studying for a Bachelor of Music (Pop), and discovered that they shared a passion for the power of language and music to tell stories, create community and remind us of our cultural identity.

Love defines this jazz-pop-RnB, husband & wife pair, and harmony is their signature.

Aro have successfully written their debut album, a ‘kiwi-esk’ project called Manu, due for release on February 15th 2019. ‘Manu’ (bird) is a bilingual – te reo Māori & English, 10 track album transcribed from the melodies and rhythms of our native birds, playing on their characteristics, and some of their significances for Māori to convey messages about life.  Following on from the release in Auckland, Aro will be touring the country with 20 shows at carefully selected venues from March to May 2019.

 

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“This is currently my go-to album to take a break from the world and let the music wash over me.” – Corinne Rutherford |muzic.net.nz

Incredible voices…gave us goosebumps! And such awesome chemistry. A pleasure to listen to and watch.” – Sophie Greenly | Concert Goer – Queenstown

“This authentic and talented duo played at Leigh Sawmill Cafe last night and deserved many more encores! Their voices together are magical, with some lyrics in Te Reo Māori and amazing looping skills…seriously worth watching! Kia ora” –  Eva Tui | Concert Goer – Leigh

“Love the musical gel linking the wairua in your voices. Kia kaha. Meinga meinga” – Jeanne Kelber Hill | Concert Goer – Paeroa

“This is lively and cheerful yet at the same time inspiring and engaging. I was completely captivated by the stories told through the birds and I very much look forward to seeing Aro perform this album live.” – Corinne Rutherford | Muzic.net album review